Saturday, November 28, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1955 Pontiac Safari

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

Wagons had many phases of popularity, and the 1950s was definitely one of the biggest.  Today I bring you the first car from the Retro Collection: a 1955 Pontiac Safari.  This wagon looks like it has been on one too many safari adventures.  It’s rusted inside and out.  The tires, seats, and headliner all share the same characteristic: ripped and rotted.  However, there is something about it that is just awesome.

Imagine the exterior as is, but with a matte clear coat over it to seal in the grunge?  Now that would look awesome.

The interior is pretty basic, but has that cool 50s jet-age look.  I love the giant lever for controlling the temperature.  I can’t tell how many miles were on it, as the odometer was pretty cloudy.  The floor is the worst part however.  There are so many holes in the bottom that the partially melted looking gas pedal is falling through one of them.

The guys at Retro gave me complete access to all the cars, but I couldn’t figure out how to get the hood open.  However, based on the V8 badge, some research, and sticking the camera through the gaps in the grill, this car probably has the 287 cubic inch V8 and makes somewhere between 180 and 200 horsepower.  That’s laughable by today’s standards with cars like the CTS-V Wagon, but this was 1955.

As for 1955, this was the first year of this car.  Only 3,760 were produced which made this the lowest produced Pontiac of 1955.

Regardless of all that, I don’t think this car will be doing any more safari cruises, or even just driving down some paved streets.  It looks like it will remain sitting here, Rotting in Style.  (Until the guys at Retro make it awesome).

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida

1955 pontiac safari station wagon retro collection abadoned florida


Saturday, November 14, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1989 Chevy Camaro!


Well, it has been some time since I have posted something for Rotting in Style.  I do apologize for that, but I have been getting about three to four days off per month, so I have been very, very busy.  Regardless, I figured if I was going to post something, it might as well be a good one.  So I bring to you a 1989 Camaro in Sitka, Alaska.  I mean, why not?  Camaros always seem to do well on here.

Anyway, abandoned Camaros seem to be quite popular in Alaska.  If you have read this blog in the past, or watched some of the past videos, you’ll remember seeing a 1989 IROC-Z and a 1979 Z28.  Well this one is a little less special as it is a 1989 Camaro RS with the 2.8L V6.  To make up for it, I did a little bit more digging.

This car was last registered in 2003 by what looks like the third and final owner, and has probably sat here since.  The last owner looks like he had a lien on it in 1992, and in 1994, it was sold at an auto auction.  How’s that for digging?

Even if it does only have the 2.8L V6, it’s still a sad sight to see for any American car lover.  This body style is personally my favorite when it comes to Camaros.  The body of this one however has the typical abandoned in Alaska accessory: moss.  There is also some dirt and rust as well.

The interior may be all there, but it seems quite scattered.  There is a transmission outside of the car, but I don’t know if it is for this Camarao or not.  The battery, I can say for sure though, is not where it is supposed to be as it’s sitting in the left headlight cutout.

While it would be nice to see this car running and driving again, I doubt it will be moving again anytime soon.  So it looks like it will remain sitting, Rotting in Style.

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.







Tuesday, October 13, 2015

PowerStop Brake Review

powerstop brake review ford mustang v6 uprage brakes random automotive














Every now and then I put something new on my 2005 V6 Mustang to make it better, or to just keep up with maintenance.  When I realized that my brake pads were pretty much just down to the metal plates behind where the pads used to be, I figured it was time to get new brakes.  Since my rotors had seen about 100,000 miles, and bits of rust flaked off of them, I figured I would go for brakes and rotors.

I could have gotten OEM stuff, but I figured I would do something a little different, but still stay on a budget.  I decided to go with a kit for my car by PowerStop which included four drilled and slotted rotors, and a complete set of Evolution ceramic brake pads.  The whole kit I got off Jegs for just over $250.  Reviews elsewhere said they were a good kit, and anything would have been better than the non-existent stock ones I had, so I figured I would go for it.

Jegs got them to me super fast.  Installation would have been easy, but my rotors were rusted in place, so I had to take my car to a shop to get them installed.  Kind of embarrassing, but it is what it is.  Once they were on, the rotors looked badass, and that’s about where the positives stop.

First off, these brakes have to be broken in.  It says that in multiple locations on the box and paperwork, and the guys at the shop told me that too.  It involves a series of hard braking from various speeds, and then a cool down period.  I drove very carefully from my shop to a street I knew I could do this on.  I made sure to use the brakes very lightly, and I kept the car in neutral at lights to avoid pad pressure on them.

I followed the break in steps, and I knew it was working because I smelled the resin it said I would.  Even after doing so, the brakes felt mushy and only slightly better than my worn out stock ones.  I was confused, but it’s not like we were talking about a six piston Brembo system, so I accepted it and dealt with it.

After about a week, I was driving home, and when I went to brake for a traffic light (at a normal braking speed), I nearly flew through the windshield.  Out of nowhere, I felt like I finally had new brakes.  That continued for the ride home.  The next morning, just tapping the brakes while exiting my parking lot caused the car to instantly stop.  Finally!  I thought that maybe they had to break in more. 

Well, as the day went on, brake fade took over and they were back to mushy.  Then the next later on they were fine.  The next morning, they started mushy, then not, and the sporadic pattern still continues to this day, months and hundreds of miles later.  I can’t tell when brake fade happens because sometimes they are there, and sometimes not.

The ABSOLUTE worst part is the rattle I have from one of them.  Granted, this could be something the shop did when installing them, but after about a month of having them, my front right something rattles VERY loudly each and every time I do so much as run over a snail or the painted lines on the road.  When I brake (even slightly), it’s gone, so it has something to do with the brakes, I’m just not sure what.  So, who knows what it is.  It really makes my car seem old and not well put together when I hear that.

Also, these brakes are “coated” to prevent rust.  That lasts a couple weeks.

powerstop brake review ford mustang v6 uprage brakes random automotive

powerstop brake review ford mustang v6 uprage brakes random automotive

So after all that, what is my conclusion?  You get what you pay for.  If you want the look of something high end, but can’t afford it, go with these.  Want something to stop like Brembos?  Seriously, get Brembos.  They have the look, when they are not rusty, but that’s about it.

Pros:
  • Look cool
  • Good price
Cons:
  • Anti-rust coating fades quickly
  • VERY inconsistent braking
  • Rattles (potentially not the brake’s fault)
So while you get fancy looking drilled and slotted rotors and you get ceramic brake pads, it’s really all about the looks with these.  Would I get them over stock again?  If I can fix the rattle, yes.

What to see more stuff like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.



Pictures courtesy of Powerstop

Saturday, September 5, 2015

Mustang Taillight Guide


mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights














Some cars are built to look different, while some are built to get from point A to point B.  As some of you may know, I am a huge Mustang fun.  They look great (some generations), they function well, and they do get you from point A to point B, but with character and fun.

A defining feature (at least for most generations) of the Mustang is the tri-bar taillight.  Yes, the pony emblem obviously, but since that is located on the front and most of Ford’s competition sees the back, well then here is a guide to be able to identify Mustangs by their tail lights.

Keep in mind that I am writing this as a compilation of my research.  I am not an expert, so while there shouldn’t be any mistakes, very minuscule details may slip past me.  This is also about taillights straight from the factory.  As time went on, and parts became more “modular”, taillights became one of the most customizable features of the Mustang in terms of aftermarket.

First Generation (1964 ½ - 1973)
This is where it all started.  It was an idea by a few great people: the men who built the Mustang.  This is obviously where we first see the now famous tri-bar taillights.  Shelby started changing the design in 1967 to an elongated version.  While he sort of strayed from the tri-bar look, he nailed a great styling.

Now, I threw in the 1970 Mustang Milano concept for a couple reasons: one, to take up the last box and make everything even, and two, because it is probably my favorite looking Mustang (even though it doesn’t exist).

1964 shelby 1971 milano 1968 1969 mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights













Second Generation (1974 – 1978)
This was a dark time in Mustang history.  A fuel crisis and government regulations hit, and killed the age of the muscle car.  Cars needed to become smaller, more fuel efficient, and more practical.  Enter the Mustang II.

It is important to note that there were special edition Mustangs during this generation, such as the Ghia, Mach 1, Cobra II, and King Cobra, but they all shared the same taillights with the year of the respective base Mustang II they were built off of.  I have also seen an example online of all three bars being red, as opposed to the center being orange, but I can’t figure out if that was original or not.  Aside from that, from what I can tell, they are all the same for this generation.

1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights







Third Generation (1979 – 1993)
Enter the even more drastic change for Mustang.  In the 80s, everything had to be a box.  The Mustang was no exception.  The Fox Body followed the small, boxy trend.  Even though taillights in the past were three bars (which are boxes), that wasn’t good enough for the 80s.  The taillights literally became boxes, and the classic tri-bar look was gone.  Occasionally, if you looked hard enough, you may see a very slight triple barred scheme going on, but it’s a stretch to say the least to try and make the comparison.

The 1984 – 1986 SVO and 93 Cobra both had special pinstriped taillights.  From 1987 to 1993, there were two different sets of lights: the LX had three boxes, and the GT had a louvered-like version.

1979 1983 svo lx gt cobra 1993 mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights













Fourth Generation (1994 – 2004)
So, we go from the 80s where everything was a box, to the 90s to where everything had to be round.  Again, the fourth generation Mustang was no exception.  At the beginning of this generation, there wasn’t a straight edge to be seen.  Toward the end of the generation, the edges thankfully started to come back, especially at the rear.  However, the tri-bar look for the taillights was back!  Even though they started off at a different orientation…

1996 finally brought back the classic tri-bar layout.  However, they looked more like elongated bubbles due to the 90s roundness.  There were special edition Mustangs during this generation, but as far as I can tell, they shared the same taillights as their lower model counterparts of the same respective year.  The only exception was the 1999/2001 Cobra.  That model offered a slightly different taillight (with amber colors), but the 2003/2004 Cobra had that year’s standard taillight.

1994 1996 1999 2004 cobra 2001 mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights







Fifth Generation (2005 – 2014)
Finally Mustang went back to the retro look.  That also includes the iconic taillights.  Well, this at least applies up until 2009.  After that, the tri-bar look still applied, but it was changed up.  A cool feature was the integration of sequential turn signals later in the generation.  Personally, the 2005 – 2009 and 2013 and 2014 taillights are some of my favorite of any generation.

Aftermarket really took off for these lights as well.  Popular upgrades for the 2005 – 2009 included black out options and sequential plug and play kits.  Even kits to resemble the 2013/2014 were made for the 2005 – 2009.  Toward the end of the generation, LED taillights became standard.  I would also argue to say that the 2013 and 2014 had some of the most thought and design go into the taillights.  I could be technically wrong, but visually, that’s what it seems.

There were a crap ton of special edition Mustangs made during this time.  The only one to really stray from the norm would be the Saleens of this generation (which simply blacked out the last bar).  Even the Iacocca edition (which now sells from $100K to $352K) used the base taillights.  That’s how awesome they were.

2005 2009 2010 2013 saleen mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights







Sixth Generation (2015 – Present)
2015 saw a complete overhaul of the Mustang from top to bottom, inside and out.  It kind of went back to the roundness of the 90s unfortunately.  Of course, the taillights were redesigned as well, and thankfully the classic tri-bar style was kept.  It was redesigned to be quite a nice looking change as well.

What does Ford have in store for us in the future?  Only time will tell, but hopefully they keep the classic tri-bar taillights.  After all, since it is something that most people see in their day to day lives, why wouldn’t Ford make them badass and iconic?

2015 2016 mustang tail light guide tri bar pony identification taillights







Thanks for stopping by!  Like what you see?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!

Thursday, September 3, 2015

How to Buy A Car Off Craigslist

buying a car off craigslist guide information random automotive
If you’ve seen my series Craigslist Car Crap, then you know that there are some interesting finds in terms of the cars listed on Craigslist.  However, there are some really good deals and decent cars on there, regardless if you are looking for your first car, a beater, or even a nice or classic car.  You just have to ask the right questions and look for the right things.

Here is a complete guide to help you make your transaction go smoothly and hopefully help you get a good car!

Looking for the Car
You obviously have to first look for the car you want.  When you find one that is interesting, make sure it has pictures of every angle of the car, and the interior.  If a picture of a certain location is missing, either the seller is lazy, or something could be wrong with that side of the car.

Look at the price, condition, and hopefully listed mileage.  If the car is newer then 1992, enter that information into Kelley Blue Book to determine the value to see if the seller is asking a reasonable price.

A good step is to also check for common problems.  If you are unfamiliar with the car you are looking at, do a quick Google search for common problems.  For example, say you are looking at a 2005 Ford V6 Mustang.  Google search, “2005 Ford V6 Mustang Common Problems”.  And see what many people (not one or two) say on forums and places like that.  Note those, and ask the seller later if they are problems on that vehicle if not listed already.

Be on the lookout for strange or little information.  The less information someone lists about a car either means, again, that they are lazy, or there are too many things wrong with it to list.  Look out for phrases like “need gone ASAP”, or “new fender”.  Why does it need to be gone?  Why did you replace that part?

Contacting the Seller
If you are interested in the car, and have done your research, contact the seller through email, or call if a number is listed.  I would suggest email so you can ask more questions.

Ask some basic questions like, how many miles are on the car (if not listed), has it been in any accidents, do you have the title (walk away if they say no), how frequently have you changed the oil (should be every 3,000 miles), any mechanical problems, any damage, have you had to replace anything, and so on.

You may also want to ask vehicle specific questions as well that may have come up during your research.  For example, if that car had a factory recall, did the work get done?

Agreeing to Meet
If you are happy with seller and his/her communications, then it’s time to meet.  Pick a time that works best for both of you.  Remember, you don’t want to waste the seller’s time, and you don’t want the seller to waste your time.

Make sure you meet during a sunny day!  Night or rain can hide defects in a car.  Now, if you are serious about buying the car, I would bring a method to do so.  Either bring the amount of cash asked for, or bring a blank check if the seller will take a check.  Again, you don’t want to waste each other’s time, so if you decide to buy it, be ready to.  However, don’t tell the person you are bringing cash for the following reason:

IF you are bringing cash, I would ALWAYS suggest bringing someone along with you.  The world can be a messed up place, and the last thing you want is for someone to know that you are bringing a large amount of cash.

Looking Over the Car
It’s very important to look over a car before buying it.  I would suggest contacting your local auto shop and seeing if they provide a service where a mechanic can come out with you to inspect a car.  If you can’t find that service, or don’t want to pay a fee for that if they charge one, there are some simple things to look out for.

The first thing is the seller: if they don’t want you to bring a mechanic, or don’t want you looking too closely, then walk away.

Look in, on, and around the car for rust.  Rust will destroy a car.  If you are planning on keeping the car for a while, you don’t want rust.  Look under, inside, and all around.  Look for mismatched paint or discoloration.  That could show that something was replaced.  Bring a refrigerator magnet.  This may seem silly, but this can help you find body damage.

ASK the seller first before you do this (because it isn’t your car yet).  Place the magnet on random sections of the car’s body.  If it sticks, you’re good.  If it falls off or has a hard time sticking (since refrigerator magnets are weak), that means there was damage done to the vehicle there, and body filler has been used.  If the owner didn’t tell you about that, he or she may be hiding something.  Keep in mind, the seller also may not have known if he or she wasn’t the original owner.  Continue this test all around the car.

Look at the interior and smell it as well.  If it smells like an air freshener was just put in, yet it doesn’t seem like a well cleaned car, it could be trying to hide the smell of mold or something else.  Look for cigarette burn holes, rips, cracks, pet hair, and anything else that may lower the value.

Look under the hood as well.  Even if you don’t know what you are looking for, look for any leaking fluids, listen for any rattles, and just use common sense and your best judgment.

When looking in, on, and around the car.  Look for anything that looks new, discolored, or out of place.  This could mean something was replaced, and you should ask why.  Was it broken, did it get damaged, was it a recall, an upgrade, and so on.

Test the lights, A/C, heat, powered/manual seat adjustments, trunk, doors, door locks, hood, and anything that moves or turns on (or should).

Test Drive
Never buy a vehicle without taking a test drive.  Bring your friend along as well if one came with you.  Do some simple driving, but ask the owner if you can also (legally) get it up to highway speed and maybe some heavy braking.  Again, ask first because this is still not your car or your gas, and you don’t want to waste the seller’s time.

If the owner says no to a test drive, walk away.  They also may just not want everyone driving the car that shows up, so let the seller know you are seriously considering the car, but can’t make on offer unless you drive it.

Making the Deal
If you are happy with the car, it’s time to make a deal.  You’ve done your research, and you’ve seen and driven the car.  Make an offer.  DO NOT low-ball (make a very insultingly low offer) on the car, or you may be told to go home.  If the asking price is 100% fair, give it to them.

Depending on the asking price, and if you bring cash, always bring the last few hundreds in smaller bills such as fifties and twenties so you can negotiate, but still have the asking price at the same time.  Point out the flaws, BUT ALSO point out the good things to make the seller feel better.  Negotiation is an art, and unfortunately will take too long to explain in this section, so basically I leave it to you to make your best judgment.

Buying the Car
Congratulations!  You have decided to buy the car.  Now you have to deal with the paperwork.  This varies by state to state (and country to country) so I unfortunately have to leave this to you to figure out.  Just remember to have completed a bill of sale, and make sure you get the title!

Buying a car off Craigslist can be shady, but it can also be a great experience.  It all depends on the seller, and how prepared you are.  If you follow these steps and make sure you do as much research as you can before meeting the seller, you’ll be golden!

Thanks for stopping by!  Like what you see?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!


Saturday, August 22, 2015

Rotting In Style - 1980 AMC Eagle

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style


Continuing my trek through Alaska, I have once again brought you back to my favorite town in existence, and that would be Skagway, Alaska.  Even in the rain, when I found this car, I could not get enough of this town.  However, the car in question is a 1980 AMC Eagle!

This is one of those love it or hate it cars.  It’s an all wheel drive station wagon that sits kind of high off the ground.  I’m guessing this is a 1980 based off the grill and AMC badge above it.  That would make this the first model of the AMC Eagle.

As for the 1980 AMC Eagle specs, this car came with a 4.2L straight six that made 110 horsepower backed by a three speed automatic that got the car only about 13.5 miles per gallon.  The selling point about this car wasn’t the engine; it was the four wheel drive.

The capability made this car very favorable for someone who wanted a station wagon for space, but needed the four wheel drive ability of a truck.  These cars became popular in snowy areas, and here it is, in Alaska.

One of the real interesting features about this car came straight from the factory.  If you remember my articles about the 1979 ElCamino and 1980 Cadillac Seville I found elsewhere in Alaska, you can see how badly rust will destroy a car in this climate.  However, if you look at this car, there is no rust.  There isn’t even rust where there was body damage.  Sure it’s covered in moss, but everything is covered in moss in Alaska.  From the factory, this car came with “Ziebart Factory Rust Protection” and a five year warranty.  This car is 36 years old, and it’s still holding up!

The interior looks like it’s in good condition, just dirty, but much like the plant sitting inside, I’m sure this car dead.  There is a commercial for this car (which you can see in the video below) which ends with the tagline, “the Eagle has landed”, but this time, I don’t think it’s getting up.  So, for now it shall remain sitting, Rotting in Style.

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1967 Morris Minor 1000

1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive


It has been a while since I have brought you are run down car on Rotting in Style, so here is one!  I am back at the Gabel Collection in Florida to bring to you a 1967 Morris Minor.  Now, I am NOT done with Alaska videos, but I just wanted to head back here to show you something different.

Anyway, yes a 1967 Morris Minor.  I knew nothing about this model or even this manufacturer until I ran into this specific car, or at least what is left of this specific car.  My research tells me this a Morris Minor 1000 based off the year that was told to me.

As for the Morris Minor 1000 specs, this car comes with a 1,098cc A-series inline four that makes a neck snapping 48 horsepower, a top speed of around 77 miles per hour, and a fuel consumption of about 38 miles per gallon.  Obviously by today’s standards, the only thing really eye catching there is the MPG rating.

The Morris Minor, which started in 1948, was so popular, that in 1961 it became the first British car to sell more than one million units.  It is interesting to note that the US made Model T was finally discontinued in 1927, and that’s after 15 million had been sold!

Speaking of selling, the original MSRP of this car was about $1,680.  That’s about $11,960 in today’s money.  That means this car was priced around what a Nissan Versa is today.

However, like all cars on Rotting in Style, this car does not look like it did back in 1967.  While you can tell it was once white, a good amount of the original metal and paint has rusted and flaked off.  Life forms and decaying plant material cover the rest.  The interior is torn up and dirty.

I don’t know if this car runs anymore, but even if it did, it’s probably going to continue to sit where it is, Rotting In Style.

That’s all for this Minor 1000.  To see more dilapidated British cars, make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive

1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive


Monday, July 6, 2015

2014 Ford Ranger in Mexico

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta














Before you start about this being last year’s model, I saw this just about over a year ago, but I haven’t got around to posting it until now.  Anyway, the Ford Ranger: the little pickup that is no longer in America.

With the F Series pickup truck being the top selling truck in the United States for decades in a row, and SUVs being exponentially popular, Ford decided to pull the plug on the Ford Ranger.  However, you can still get the little truck in certain locations such as Mexico.

My last job involved much traveling, and while I enjoyed many sights, so much of them involved the blogs that I run.  You may have seen the rental car graveyard in Hawaii that I posted recently.  When I was in Mexico, Puerto Vallarta specifically, I came across a Ford dealer.

Sitting right on the lot was a brand new 2014 Ford Ranger.  To the citizens of Mexico, it may not attract much attention, but to a gringo like myself, I had to take some pictures.  Now, I didn’t want to attract attention from the sales people or from anyone around, so I snapped two quick pictures and left.

The model I saw there happened to have the 2.2L inline four, diesel engine.  I found it advertised to make 88 kW of power, which translates to 118 horsepower.  It also makes 285 Nm of torque, which is about 210 foot pounds.  The badge on the side says “six speed”, but I don’t know if that meant automatic or manual, because the internet says it can come with either.

Match that small diesel engine up with a six speed, and this truck cranks out about 30.9 MPG!  I would drive that all day.

The truck on the lot was painted like just about every other car was on the lot: white.  I guess their sales are more corporate based since white it a common color for that, but I’m just guessing.  It was also pretty much a work truck.  Again, it was white, and the wheels were very basic.  I didn’t get a chance to see the price, because again, it was snap and go for me.

So there you have it: the truck the US won’t see.  I do have some more vehicles from Mexico on the way, so if you want to see them, make sure you stop by!  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Rental Car Graveyard in Hawaii

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive



Ever wonder what happens to rental cars once they are no longer the most current model year, recalled, or something like that?  It honestly never really crossed my mind.  I assumed they got auctioned off or sold, and while that may be the case in most locations, Hawaii seems to be a little different.

The last job that I had involved lots of traveling.  However, I am cheap, so regardless of where I went, I walked everywhere and the only thing I spent was time, and I spent it enjoying the sights and taking pictures.

One of the locations I was at was Hawaii.  I made extensive use of the GPS on my phone to find my way around, and on the on the island of Kauai, I decided to walk to the Ahukini Recreation Pier State Park.  From the GPS view, it looked like a good place to see some sights.  However, when looking at the map, I saw what looked like a junkyard.  Naturally I had to check it out for Rotting in Style.  I mean, why not?  It was next to the road I had to walk down anyway.

rental car graveyard hawaii camaro mustang abandoned

When I got there, I was surprised to find myself looking at dozens of year or two year old Mustangs and Camaros.  Lines and lines of these cars bumper to bumper.  Next to them were Jeeps, minivans, compact cars, trucks, and more, all just a couple years old.  I wasn’t exactly sure what I was looking at.

I walked down the rows and looked for cars with door pins that were up.  After locating all of those, I walked back down the row again and hopped in one of the cars while no one was driving down the road.  Inside the car, I found rental car paperwork.  So I guess when they are done with them, they end up here!

Now these cars are only a few years old, and they are located on ONE island, but the ones that I saw had 15,000 to 22,000 plus miles on them!  I also learned that with a Camaro, you don’t need a key to get the radio to turn on, so needless to say, I listened to some tunes.

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

I assume in most situations, the cars would be packed up on a truck and delivered to wherever they are destined to go next.  If they are on an island though, I guess you have to wait to have enough to stick them on a cargo ship or something.  It was pretty cool to see lines and lines of these cars.  Most of them where completely exposed, and only a handful were behind a locked fence area.  It was sad to report that none of the cars had the keys in them.  Yes, I did look.

It was something I’ll probably never see again.  Needless to say, while most of the people I worked with were off swimming or looking at volcanoes, I was admiring the nearly 100 cars that just sat in a field awaiting their next life.  Ah the sights of Hawaii.

What to see more stuff like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive


Monday, June 8, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1961 Chevy Lakewood (Corvair 500)

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned














When I had the privilege of spending four months in Alaska, I took advantage of all the sights that I possibly could.  This included the vast amount of abandoned cars that I had found.  One of the towns I was in was Skagway, Alaska.  Anyone who played the old computer game “Yukon Trail” should recognize the name.  It was a gorgeous small little town of just over 900 residents, but with a vast amount of abandoned cars.

One house had quite a few in the yard.  The woman I approached told me she was renting the property.  The owner of the house inherited the land with the house and cars on it when his father passed away.  While the cars are mostly now all junk, he doesn’t want to get rid of them due to sentimental value.  That works for me, because now I can bring them all to you, including this 1961 Chevy Lakewood (Chevy Corvair 500 Lakewood).

This car is pretty rare as it was only built in 1961 and 1962.  I cannot confirm this is in fact a 1961, so I’m just making an assumption here.  Anyway, this was the base Chevy station wagon as it was built off of the cheap Corvair 500 platform.  It came with a 146 cubic inch flat six that made 86 horsepower which was located in the rear of the car.  Now apparently, that was enough of a power to weight ratio to blast this car up and down sand dunes.  Check out the video at the end which includes an old commercial where Chevy did just that.

This car’s days of dune crushing though are over.  It is being completely overgrown.  This grass was well past my knees.  Rust was replacing the paint; not too aggressively surprisingly, but it was sure enough.  It was also accompanied with moss, which was very common on anything that didn’t move much in Alaska.  Having been granted free range, I opened the doors to check out the inside.  It was dusty, dirty, and musty.  It also had a couple trees growing in it.

The original dealer badge was located on the rear of the car: Taylor and Drury Motor Limited.  I couldn’t find much about them except for the fact that they were located in Whitehorse Yukon Territory, which you can also figure out from the badge itself, and that Taylor and Drury was a big business name in the area for other businesses apparently as well.

The dealer is long gone, and this car is fading away as well.  It’s now destined to be overgrown as is sits in Skagway, Alaska, Rotting in Style.

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned


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