Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Using Naval Jelly on a Rusty Car
















Cars get rusty as time goes on. They are made of metal, so it’s as simple as that. Unless you are driving a 1980 AMC Eagle, it will happen to you. You have probably seen my 1971 Ford Torino 500 before if you have read this blog. If not, go check it out! It’s very rusty. Now, I do co-own a body shop, but for some strange reason, I decided to try to do everything at home by hand.

Sanding sort of worked, but I wanted to give Naval Jelly a try. You’re supposed to brush it on, and in five to ten minutes, rinse it off and the rust is gone. I have looked to see if anyone has used this on a car before. Many people have used it on small car parts and small sections of a car, but never large panels or parts of a car. So, I did.

I tested it out on a portion of the roof and part of the gas tank in the trunk. I left the first coat on for about 20 minutes. It did something. There was an outline where the product was, and that area was lighter. Now, this rust is pretty nasty. It’s deep, and has pitted the metal.

naval jelly on a rusty car 1971 ford torino safe rust removal how to remove rust

I decided to try another coat, but after hitting it with a wire brush and cleaning the area with acetone. After the second coat, the area got lighter again. So I followed the same steps: apply, sit, rise, wire brush, acetone, repeat.

Eventually, I started seeing bare metal on the gas tank. Finally! The roof seemed to have exposed an old layer of primer. I wanted to do more, but I unexpectedly had an unrelated issue I had to take care of. So, I just managed to do these smaller sections, but at least I manged to actually see Naval Jelly used on a car!

All in all, it worked. It wasn’t the most spectacular thing, but with some elbow grease, I would say that it is a good way to get rid of rust. With more time, I could have gotten much more off. Is it better than sanding? Well, sanding helped, but my arm was done by the time I finished. With this, I was feeling much less fatigued. So, I leave that choice up to you.

naval jelly on a rusty car 1971 ford torino safe rust removal how to remove rust
naval jelly on a rusty car 1971 ford torino safe rust removal how to remove rust
naval jelly on a rusty car 1971 ford torino safe rust removal how to remove rust
naval jelly on a rusty car 1971 ford torino safe rust removal how to remove rust

Like what you read? Want more tips and tricks? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by.






Wednesday, September 12, 2018

When You Lock Yourself Out Of Your Car

1971 ford torino 500 locked myself out of my car wire hanger















Well... I never thought it would happen to me, but I managed to lock myself out of my car.  After about 20 minutes of trying with a wire hanger, I remembered the giant rust hole in my floors.  The rest is history.  Take a look at the video.  How many have you been here before?  Let me know your stories in the comment section.





Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Why I Don't Watch Roadkill Anymore

roadkill motortrend on demand i will not pay the random automotive














If you’ve seen this blog before, you probably have seen a few episodes of MotorTrend’s show Roadkill. It’s about two guys, David Freiburger and Mike Finnegan of Hot Rod Network, who build unique automotive creations and put those rides to the test. Road trips, dirt tracks, and so on. 

As a fan of the American version of Top Gear, I fell in love with this show from the very beginning. It was one of MotorTrend’s most popular shows on YouTube when Angus MacKenzie announced that the channel would be bringing out new content. Roadkill soared in popularity. The episode “Rat Rod VS Lamborghini Aventador” has over 53 million views (the channel’s second highest viewed video). They also have 1.4 million followers on their Facebook page. 

Well, MotorTrend changed. They stopped putting full content on their YouTube channel, and now have everything over at their own platform call MotorTrend On Demand (MTOD), which is a platform you have to pay for. I get it. As someone on YouTube myself, YouTube changed a lot recently, and it hurt a bunch of people. The problem is, it really hurt the little people. MotorTrend has 5.8 million subscribers. I assume they felt something too, and probably didn’t have as much creative control over the ads that they wanted. 

MotorTrend On Demand was releasing the most current episode of Roadkill for free, and then when the next one was out, they would lock the previous one. I am the kind of person that has to watch things in order, even if it’s not needed. So, from the very beginning, I never missed one episode. Well, I missed one one day before it got locked. I haven’t watched one since. If this was something I paid for from the beginning, that would be a different story, but this was a change after years.

I’m all about what something is worth. I do believe the price is fair, but not when it always used to be free. Foe reference, the price is currently $4.99 per month. It’s a principle thing.

Any time a preview video is shown on YouTube, the subscribers vent and tell their frustration. Same with ads on Facebook. They only place that seems to be tolerable of MTOD are more of the people who like the Roadkill Facebook page.

roadkill motortrend on demand i will not pay the random automotive
One of their ads on Facebook for MTOD.

Roadkill helped me get through rough times. You know: life. We all have our ups and downs. Well, when I had downs, Roadkill would ALWAYS get me to laugh. Between the way Freiburger and Finnegan interact with each other, to the way their cars always break. I would always have the biggest smile on my face. I guess I won’t any more. 

I know I’m just being cheap, but when the expectation is set that Roadkill will always be free, you expect that. 

Like this kind of content? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter. It’s free… Thanks for stopping by!


Monday, September 3, 2018

Rotting in Style - 1967 Plymouth Belveder II

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel














I haven’t made a Rotting in Style post in a while, but Alaska is always on my mind. Four years ago, I was walking around the streets of the small town Skagway, Alaska, my favorite place ever. I came across this in someone’s driveway. 

This is a 1967 Plymouth Belvedere II. It really caught my attention for two reasons: its condition and the fact that it reminded me of the car the bad guys drove in the 1997 movie Dukes of Hazard Reunion, which was one of my favorite childhood movies. I’m still not sure what car that was.

I can’t tell you much about this car. I don’t know what engine it had, the history behind it, or anything like that. This was just a random find that I walked onto someone’s property to film.

It is missing the trim on the side, but what I can be sure it does have is one hubcap, lots of rust, and moss. Moss grows on every abandoned car that I’ve seen in Alaska. It has a V8 badge on the hood, but they only offered V8s in this car: a 273, 383, 318, 340, or 426. Being a four door, I would assume it has one of the smaller ones. 

Another car full of moss: Abandoned 1979 El Camino 

The exterior had plenty of surface rust. There was a pretty big gash on the passenger side of the car. The interior was average for a car of its age. I don’t know when the last time it was driven. Based off the moss, dirt, and other signs, it looks like it has been sitting for a while. It’s not the most iconic car, but perhaps that makes it even more interesting to see sitting abandoned. 

It was raining quite a bit that day, but it didn’t stop me from having a good day, and enjoying the amazing sights that Alaska had to offer, including this old school American steel, which remains Rotting in Style. I have plenty of other Rotting in Style videos and posts for you the check out on my blog and YouTube channel, and there are more to come. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter. Thanks for stopping by! 






1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel

1967 Plymouth Belvedere II abandoned skagway alaska rotting in styel


Sunday, June 3, 2018

Should You Change Your Oil Yourself?

Should you change your own oil?  The Random Automotive Oil Change.














I’m just a hobbyist, but I consider myself a car guy. Due to that, I usually get a lot of flack for not changing my own oil, and taking it to a shop and getting it done. Why do I do it? Cost and time. I always have to end up defending myself. Here’s why it’s okay to get it done.

Let me start by saying that I do know how to change my oil. I believe that everyone should know how to do it for his or her car. The principle is the same for all vehicles, but there are little things that can differ from one vehicle to the next. It’s a great skill to have, but I’ve realized that it’s not always needed.

Cost is a big thing for me to take into consideration. I am cheap. Most people say that changing your own yourself is cheaper. For me, I have found that to not be the case. For my 2005 Mustang, I just use standard oil. I use what Ford says I should. There is a Firestone Complete Auto Care by me that I always use a coupon for. I can get it done for around $23. 

Time is also a big factor to think about. With the amount I drive, I have to get an oil change about every three to four months. Not only do I have to change it more frequently then I would like, I also work for about eight companies. I work every day. As of writing this, I’ve had about five days off this year. Do the math: that’s less than one day off per month. Every minute that I can work, I take advantage of it. If I’m under my car worrying about oil, I can’t work. For me, that’s not good.

Weather is big. In Florida, I would rather not be under my car in 114 degrees (as it was last year. With humidity.) Sitting inside the lobby of an air conditioned (or heated if you’re in a northern winter) is a much better idea. 

Again, I will stress that it is important to know how to change your oil. It is on the top five of the most basic maintenance things you need to know how to do on your car. However, I have found it more convenient to not do it myself. 

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Sunday, May 13, 2018

How To Change Your Spark Plugs


Changing your spark plugs is a very important part of vehicle maintenance. Depending on where they are located in your vehicle, they can be rather easy to do. Spark plugs deliver the park that ignites the fuel and air mixture in your engine. Over time, these can get fouled and degrade. If they don’t deliver the spark that your engine needs, your engine may begin to misfire, and that’s not good.

If you have OEM (standard/stock) spark plugs in your car, then consult your manual or dealer to determine when they should be changed. If they are aftermarket ones, check with the manufacturer.

When it comes to actually changing them, if you have a very compact engine bay, they may be challenging to get to. If you can’t get to all of them, I would suggest taking your car to a mechanic. You don’t want to run the risk of potentially damaging the threads of your engine block if you try to yank one out the wrong way. 

All that aside, if you can reach them all, it’s simple. Here is what you need:
  • Ratchet
  • Spark plug socket 

The most important thing to remember is going one by one. Your car has a very specific firing order (the order which the spark plugs get their spark). That may not be in sequential order. You can do a quick Google search to find out your car’s firing order is. 

Start with a plug located at one side/end, and work your way down if it’s an inline engine, or down and around if it’s a “V” engine (V6, V8, etc.) This just helps keep things in order. 

Grab the boot of your spark plug wire (the end attached to the spark plug), and pull it. You may need to wiggle it a little. It will “pop” off. This will expose the plug. Fit your socket around the plug, and begin loosening it. It may be firm at first, but it will free up. Depending on how much room you have to move the ratchet, it may take quite a few turns. 

Once it is out, discard it, and get your new plug. You should start threading it into the engine block by hand. This will help prevent cross-threading, which can cause some serious damage. After a couple turns, use your socket to finish the job. DO NOT over-tighten it. Get it firm, but not wrenched down. Take the boot of your previously disconnected spark plug wire, and push it down on the spark plug. It should “pop” into place. 

Repeat this for the rest of your plugs. Again, go one by one to not mess up the order. Once you are done, start up your car. It should run like normal. If it is rough, turn off the car and push down on all the wires to make sure they are firmly seated on the plugs. Confirm that the wires are running to the correct spark plug by checking are firing order diagram. 

There you have it! You’re done. See? I told you it wasn’t that bad. If you are more of a visual learner, check out the video below. What to see more stuff like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by. 




Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Ultimate Tune-Up

how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive














It’s an unfortunate fact of a car’s life that when it gets old, it gets worst. Sometimes it’s obvious when something breaks, but other times it’s harder to tell when it simply doesn’t run the way it used to. For a couple bucks, and few minutes of your time, you can make your car run almost like new again.

You don’t need any advanced mechanical skills. All you need to do is buy some specific cleaners, a couple tools (that you probably have most of already), and just a few minutes of your time. Yes, you can make your car run so much better that cheaply, and in about 30 minutes. Here’s how…

First off, if you’re new to vehicles and not exactly sure where parts are, check out The Random Automotive’s guide: Car Basics – What’s Under the Hood.

Fuel System/Injector Cleaner

As time goes on, deposits can build up in your fuel system, including your fuel injectors. Fuel injectors are what spray the correct amount of gas into your engine, which is then ignited by the spark plugs. Injectors are expensive, so it is best to take care of them. Taking care of them also allows your engine to receive the correct amount of fuel that it needs.

At any auto parts store, or even Walmart, you can find a fuel system cleaner. I picked Gumout, but a very popular brand is also Seafoam. Seafoam takes bit more effort, so take note of that. Follow all instructions on the bottle. Basically what it comes down to is to run your gas tank to nearly empty, empty the correct amount of cleaner into your gas tank, and then fill up. It should help break up carbon deposits in your engine, and clean your injectors.

Change your Air Filter

For you to live, you have to breathe. Your car is no different. Your engine pulls in air through its intake system, that air is mixed with the fuel from your injectors, and your sparkplugs ignite the mixture. The first part of the intake system is your air filter.

This is generally located in your airbox. You can check your manual or online to find out where it is in your vehicle. If your filter is brown and covered in leaves, it’s time to change it. It’s only a couple bucks at your local auto parts store, and it’s simply a matter of pulling the old one out and putting the new one in. Your car needs clean air, like you.


Clean your Mass Airflow Sensor (MAF)

Now things get a bit more “mechanical,” but are still very easy. Your mass airflow sensor is located after your air filter in your intake tube. It’s made of some electronic components that read and measure the air coming in. Based off those readings, it will tell the engine how to run: how much fuel, idle speed, and so on. So, if this gets dirty, you could get false readings, and your car may not run as well.

For a couple bucks, you can pick up some MAF cleaner. Locate your sensor in your intake tube. Normally it either splits your tube into two pieces, or is something that is stuck into it. It generally is the only thing directly past your air filter that has an electric connector going to it. Pop that connector off, then unscrew or unclamp it, and carefully remove it. Follow the directions on the can, but you generally spray it down and reinstall it. Be careful not to touch or damage the diodes on the MAF, or your car may not run correctly.

This will make a world of difference, especially if you’ve never done this before to your car.

how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive
how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive

Clean your Throttle Body

This is one of the more advanced things we’ll be doing, but it will help a lot. Your throttle body controls how much air actually enters the engine. Inside the body of the throttle body itself is a valve or two that open and close to control the flow of air. Over time, carbon and other grim will form on and around it. This can cause your car to sputter or stall at idle or in park. 

Like everything else, you can pick up throttle body cleaner for a couple bucks. Do not use carburetor cleaner. Unclamp and pull back or remove your intake hose from the throttle body. This will expose the valve. Spray your cleaner onto an old cotton t-shirt. Begin gently wiping down the inside of the housing and the valve. You’ll need to clean the behind and the backside of the valve. Gently push the bottom of the valve to open it. Use your other hand to clean the backside and the rest of the housing behind it. Don’t push too aggressively. Most newer throttle bodies are electronically controlled, and you don't want to damage the motor.

how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive
how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive

Change your Sparkplugs

Sparkplugs are what is responsible for the combustion of your engine. Check your manual as to when they need to be replaced. Replacing them could be simple, or a major pain in the ass depending on where they are located. Make sure you can access each plug before you begin. You will need your new plugs, a ratchet, and sparkplug socket.

It's a simple as removing your spark plug wire, unscrewing the old plug, putting the new one in, and reinstalling your wire. The biggest thing to make sure of is that you’re putting the wire back on the plug you took it off of. If you don’t, it could mess up your car’s firing order. To make it easy, just replace one at a time.

how to tune up yoru car clean throttle body clean maf run like new the random automotive

So there you have it! For about $20 (minus the cost of the sparkplugs) and about thirty minutes of your time, you can make your car run almost like new again! Going to a shop to do this would probably cost you over $100. Take care of your car, and it will take care of you! 

What to see more stuff like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by.



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