Saturday, August 22, 2015

Rotting In Style - 1980 AMC Eagle

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style


Continuing my trek through Alaska, I have once again brought you back to my favorite town in existence, and that would be Skagway, Alaska.  Even in the rain, when I found this car, I could not get enough of this town.  However, the car in question is a 1980 AMC Eagle!

This is one of those love it or hate it cars.  It’s an all wheel drive station wagon that sits kind of high off the ground.  I’m guessing this is a 1980 based off the grill and AMC badge above it.  That would make this the first model of the AMC Eagle.

As for the 1980 AMC Eagle specs, this car came with a 4.2L straight six that made 110 horsepower backed by a three speed automatic that got the car only about 13.5 miles per gallon.  The selling point about this car wasn’t the engine; it was the four wheel drive.

The capability made this car very favorable for someone who wanted a station wagon for space, but needed the four wheel drive ability of a truck.  These cars became popular in snowy areas, and here it is, in Alaska.

One of the real interesting features about this car came straight from the factory.  If you remember my articles about the 1979 ElCamino and 1980 Cadillac Seville I found elsewhere in Alaska, you can see how badly rust will destroy a car in this climate.  However, if you look at this car, there is no rust.  There isn’t even rust where there was body damage.  Sure it’s covered in moss, but everything is covered in moss in Alaska.  From the factory, this car came with “Ziebart Factory Rust Protection” and a five year warranty.  This car is 36 years old, and it’s still holding up!

The interior looks like it’s in good condition, just dirty, but much like the plant sitting inside, I’m sure this car dead.  There is a commercial for this car (which you can see in the video below) which ends with the tagline, “the Eagle has landed”, but this time, I don’t think it’s getting up.  So, for now it shall remain sitting, Rotting in Style.

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

1980 amc eagle station wangon abandoned skagway alaska random automotive rotting in style

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1967 Morris Minor 1000

1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive


It has been a while since I have brought you are run down car on Rotting in Style, so here is one!  I am back at the Gabel Collection in Florida to bring to you a 1967 Morris Minor.  Now, I am NOT done with Alaska videos, but I just wanted to head back here to show you something different.

Anyway, yes a 1967 Morris Minor.  I knew nothing about this model or even this manufacturer until I ran into this specific car, or at least what is left of this specific car.  My research tells me this a Morris Minor 1000 based off the year that was told to me.

As for the Morris Minor 1000 specs, this car comes with a 1,098cc A-series inline four that makes a neck snapping 48 horsepower, a top speed of around 77 miles per hour, and a fuel consumption of about 38 miles per gallon.  Obviously by today’s standards, the only thing really eye catching there is the MPG rating.

The Morris Minor, which started in 1948, was so popular, that in 1961 it became the first British car to sell more than one million units.  It is interesting to note that the US made Model T was finally discontinued in 1927, and that’s after 15 million had been sold!

Speaking of selling, the original MSRP of this car was about $1,680.  That’s about $11,960 in today’s money.  That means this car was priced around what a Nissan Versa is today.

However, like all cars on Rotting in Style, this car does not look like it did back in 1967.  While you can tell it was once white, a good amount of the original metal and paint has rusted and flaked off.  Life forms and decaying plant material cover the rest.  The interior is torn up and dirty.

I don’t know if this car runs anymore, but even if it did, it’s probably going to continue to sit where it is, Rotting In Style.

That’s all for this Minor 1000.  To see more dilapidated British cars, make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive

1967 morris minor rotting in style british classic car dylan benson random automotive


Monday, July 6, 2015

2014 Ford Ranger in Mexico

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta














Before you start about this being last year’s model, I saw this just about over a year ago, but I haven’t got around to posting it until now.  Anyway, the Ford Ranger: the little pickup that is no longer in America.

With the F Series pickup truck being the top selling truck in the United States for decades in a row, and SUVs being exponentially popular, Ford decided to pull the plug on the Ford Ranger.  However, you can still get the little truck in certain locations such as Mexico.

My last job involved much traveling, and while I enjoyed many sights, so much of them involved the blogs that I run.  You may have seen the rental car graveyard in Hawaii that I posted recently.  When I was in Mexico, Puerto Vallarta specifically, I came across a Ford dealer.

Sitting right on the lot was a brand new 2014 Ford Ranger.  To the citizens of Mexico, it may not attract much attention, but to a gringo like myself, I had to take some pictures.  Now, I didn’t want to attract attention from the sales people or from anyone around, so I snapped two quick pictures and left.

The model I saw there happened to have the 2.2L inline four, diesel engine.  I found it advertised to make 88 kW of power, which translates to 118 horsepower.  It also makes 285 Nm of torque, which is about 210 foot pounds.  The badge on the side says “six speed”, but I don’t know if that meant automatic or manual, because the internet says it can come with either.

Match that small diesel engine up with a six speed, and this truck cranks out about 30.9 MPG!  I would drive that all day.

The truck on the lot was painted like just about every other car was on the lot: white.  I guess their sales are more corporate based since white it a common color for that, but I’m just guessing.  It was also pretty much a work truck.  Again, it was white, and the wheels were very basic.  I didn’t get a chance to see the price, because again, it was snap and go for me.

So there you have it: the truck the US won’t see.  I do have some more vehicles from Mexico on the way, so if you want to see them, make sure you stop by!  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta

2014 ford ranger mexico random automotive dylan benson puerto vallarta


Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Rental Car Graveyard in Hawaii

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive



Ever wonder what happens to rental cars once they are no longer the most current model year, recalled, or something like that?  It honestly never really crossed my mind.  I assumed they got auctioned off or sold, and while that may be the case in most locations, Hawaii seems to be a little different.

The last job that I had involved lots of traveling.  However, I am cheap, so regardless of where I went, I walked everywhere and the only thing I spent was time, and I spent it enjoying the sights and taking pictures.

One of the locations I was at was Hawaii.  I made extensive use of the GPS on my phone to find my way around, and on the on the island of Kauai, I decided to walk to the Ahukini Recreation Pier State Park.  From the GPS view, it looked like a good place to see some sights.  However, when looking at the map, I saw what looked like a junkyard.  Naturally I had to check it out for Rotting in Style.  I mean, why not?  It was next to the road I had to walk down anyway.


When I got there, I was surprised to find myself looking at dozens of year or two year old Mustangs and Camaros.  Lines and lines of these cars bumper to bumper.  Next to them were Jeeps, minivans, compact cars, trucks, and more, all just a couple years old.  I wasn’t exactly sure what I was looking at.

I walked down the rows and looked for cars with door pins that were up.  After locating all of those, I walked back down the row again and hopped in one of the cars while no one was driving down the road.  Inside the car, I found rental car paperwork.  So I guess when they are done with them, they end up here!

Now these cars are only a few years old, and they are located on ONE island, but the ones that I saw had 15,000 to 22,000 plus miles on them!  I also learned that with a Camaro, you don’t need a key to get the radio to turn on, so needless to say, I listened to some tunes.

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

I assume in most situations, the cars would be packed up on a truck and delivered to wherever they are destined to go next.  If they are on an island though, I guess you have to wait to have enough to stick them on a cargo ship or something.  It was pretty cool to see lines and lines of these cars.  Most of them where completely exposed, and only a handful were behind a locked fence area.  It was sad to report that none of the cars had the keys in them.  Yes, I did look.

It was something I’ll probably never see again.  Needless to say, while most of the people I worked with were off swimming or looking at volcanoes, I was admiring the nearly 100 cars that just sat in a field awaiting their next life.  Ah the sights of Hawaii.

What to see more stuff like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive

car graveyard hawaii kauai rental cars mustang camaro jeep dylan benson random automotive


Monday, June 8, 2015

Rotting in Style - 1961 Chevy Lakewood (Corvair 500)

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned














When I had the privilege of spending four months in Alaska, I took advantage of all the sights that I possibly could.  This included the vast amount of abandoned cars that I had found.  One of the towns I was in was Skagway, Alaska.  Anyone who played the old computer game “Yukon Trail” should recognize the name.  It was a gorgeous small little town of just over 900 residents, but with a vast amount of abandoned cars.

One house had quite a few in the yard.  The woman I approached told me she was renting the property.  The owner of the house inherited the land with the house and cars on it when his father passed away.  While the cars are mostly now all junk, he doesn’t want to get rid of them due to sentimental value.  That works for me, because now I can bring them all to you, including this 1961 Chevy Lakewood (Chevy Corvair 500 Lakewood).

This car is pretty rare as it was only built in 1961 and 1962.  I cannot confirm this is in fact a 1961, so I’m just making an assumption here.  Anyway, this was the base Chevy station wagon as it was built off of the cheap Corvair 500 platform.  It came with a 146 cubic inch flat six that made 86 horsepower which was located in the rear of the car.  Now apparently, that was enough of a power to weight ratio to blast this car up and down sand dunes.  Check out the video at the end which includes an old commercial where Chevy did just that.

This car’s days of dune crushing though are over.  It is being completely overgrown.  This grass was well past my knees.  Rust was replacing the paint; not too aggressively surprisingly, but it was sure enough.  It was also accompanied with moss, which was very common on anything that didn’t move much in Alaska.  Having been granted free range, I opened the doors to check out the inside.  It was dusty, dirty, and musty.  It also had a couple trees growing in it.

The original dealer badge was located on the rear of the car: Taylor and Drury Motor Limited.  I couldn’t find much about them except for the fact that they were located in Whitehorse Yukon Territory, which you can also figure out from the badge itself, and that Taylor and Drury was a big business name in the area for other businesses apparently as well.

The dealer is long gone, and this car is fading away as well.  It’s now destined to be overgrown as is sits in Skagway, Alaska, Rotting in Style.

What to see more cars like this?  Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by.






rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned

rotting in style dylan benson chevy lakewood corvair 500 1961 skagway alaska abandoned


Sunday, June 7, 2015

The Elusive Chrysler 300

chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustang

Everyone remembers their first car.  I personally still own and drive mine.  It is my first and only car I have owned.  It comes up in videos and blog posts from time to time.  However, it wasn’t always supposed to be my first car.  This post isn’t a review, it isn’t an abandoned car, and it isn’t a tip or trick.  This is a story: the story of the elusive Chrysler 300 SRT8.

Back in 2009, I was a junior in high school, and it was time for me to start looking for my first car.  I was a little picky.  I wanted something that looked nice.  It would be used obviously, but something nice none the less, and it had to be American.  I was mainly looking at Mustang’s and the newer (at the time) Dodge Chargers.  My price range was obviously a higher mileage V6 version of either if I wanted the current body style.

chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustangThings changed when I came across some vehicles that were repossessed at a bank in the next town over.  Among them was a 2006 Chrysler 300 SRT8.  It was very done up.  A very custom paint job, a custom interior, custom exhaust, engine upgrades, and Lamborghini doors.  While some of the upgrades were questionable for a band geek white boy, I still fell in love with the car.  The starting bid to get me in was $8000.  I promptly put in my bid.

The car was kind of “ghetto”, but it was bad ass.  There was damage to the exterior because apparently the previous owner tried to hide it in tight spaces when he knew it was going to get repossessed.  It had dings on the paint from driving, and the interior was kind of worn due to lower cost upgrades, but I still wanted this car.

chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustang
chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustang

Now, I had someone who knew someone at the bank, and he was feeding me information about the car.  Turns out there was only one other person interested, and my bid remained the highest after only increasing by a few hundred.  This car was mine.  My friends at school knew it, my family knew it, and so on.

The bids increased though, and it eventually made it to my limit: $10,000.  I had to save money for registration and insurance, so against my wishes, I could not make the next bid to $10,500.  I had to back out.  It was very depressing, and that year for my birthday, my mom had gotten me car cleaning stuff because I was supposed to be getting that car.  It was a depressing birthday.

As time went on, I managed to get the car I still own and drive today: my 2005 V6 Mustang.  The Chrysler 300 SRT8 still haunted me though.  I would occasionally see it driving down the highway, normally while I was at marching band practice.  One time while I was in a bus, I saw it parked in a parking lot.  What struck me as odd was that it had used car dealer plates on it.  This went on for over a year; seeing it here and there.  Finally, it happened.

I forgot where I was going, but I do know it was to a place that I had never been before, so I was in a part of New Jersey that I was unfamiliar with.  I was on a long desolate road, but in the distance I saw the rear of a car.  I recognized the paint job instantly.  It was the Chrysler 300 SRT8!  I put all senses aside and decided to chase it down.

chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustang

When I got to my first red light behind it, I didn’t think and jumped out of my car and ran up to the 300.  The windows were almost limo tint (definitely illegal for New Jersey).  I couldn’t see who was inside, but I knocked on the window.  It rolled down, and an average looking “Jersey” man sat there.  In the passenger seat was a woman with basketballs for breasts.  I spoke first and asked if the car was still for sale.  The man said it was and when I inquired how much, he said it was twenty-something grand.  I said, “That’s a lot more than the ten grand you paid for it!”  Without hesitation, he said right back to me, “I paid nine.”

I was dumbfounded.  How was this possible?  I had the higher bid.  I bid ten thousand!  The light turned green, so I ran back to my car.  I decided to follow him.  I had no idea where I was, or where he was even going, but I followed.  We stopped at a body shop.  The man got out of the car and made his way to mine.  To avoid him killing me, I quickly jumped out of my car and explained the story.

Turns out he was the man that repossessed the car for the bank.  I guess the bank wanted to assure he got the car, even if it meant less money for them.  Who knows what the deal was, all I know was that I lost unfairly, and he got the car.  I was glad I finally knew what happened to the car, but I wasn’t satisfied.  I couldn’t end the chase.  Not yet.

One of the things with the car being at the bank was that I couldn’t test-drive it.  I wanted to know what this car was like.  I asked the man in front of me if we could go for a ride.  He agreed.  He walked away, and in a short while returned, and I hopped in the passenger seat.  We chatted a bit more, and then we were on another desolate, open, and lonely road.  He stopped in the middle: a dead stop.  I was nervous.  What did I get myself in to?  What was he going to do? 

Finally after what seemed like an eternity, he pressed the brake down fully, then mashed on the gas, and did the biggest burnout that I had ever been in a vehicle for.  The V8 screamed, the tires wailed, and smoke filled the air with the sweet aroma of burning rubber.  With a large smile on my face, I knew the chase was over.  I may not have gotten the car, but I found out what happened.  The chase had come to an end, and the story was finished.  The Chrysler 300 SRT8 had eluded me for over a year, but I finally caught her, and I was able to close the book on the story of the elusive Chrysler 300.

chrysler 300 first car srt8 v8 dylan benson new jersey repo mustang

Friday, May 29, 2015

Cheap Yet Effective Quick Detailer

the random automotive florida dylan benson meguiar's quik detailer quick spray wax detailing mustang














For those of you that have read this blog before, you know that I wipe down my car each time before I drive it.  You also know that my favorite quick detailer is Bead X by Wax Daddy, and my second favorite is Dash-It.  Those bottles are expensive!  We’re talking around $16 for one bottle.  However, they are incredible products.  But since I use it almost daily, I couldn’t afford to keep up with it.

After browsing the shelves of Walmart, I decided to give Meguiar’s Quik Detailer a shot.  The thing that attracted me to it the most was the fact that it was around five bucks, and I am a cheap SOB.  I figured, why not?

At first, I will say that the bottle leaked for me.  Perhaps I broke a seal around the neck or something, but the bottle tipped over in transport, and I lost some product.  Again, for the price, I was not too concerned.  Aside from that, the bottle sprays very evenly.  That is something I really liked as both the bottles for the previously mentioned products are not that great.

Allow me to pause… I will be comparing this product to the more expensive ones quite frequently.  Why?  Because they are my benchmarks and I swear by them.  Un-pause…

the random automotive florida dylan benson meguiar's quik detailer quick spray wax detailing mustang
The first thing I actually noticed was the scent.  Bead X has an intoxicating scent that I love, Dash-It has a green apple smell (I don’t like green apple anything, but it was a good effort), but this smells like a cleaner.  Is that a bad thing?  Perhaps not, but it is something to point out.

At first, when I wiped the product off with a micro fiber towel on my car that had been sitting outside over night (after having been wiped off day after day before this), it didn’t feel as smooth as the other products.  That was an instant turn off.  However, I will say after days of using it, I have noticed a difference.  It did rain the night before the first use, so perhaps the cheaper detailer had a harder time punching through the extra grit the more expensive ones can tackle no problem.  It seems nice and smooth now.

It will aid it removing bugs, dirt, hard water spots, and other unwanted grim, and for around five bucks, it does quite well at it.  It leaves behind a nice shine that I am impressed with.  It’s very comparable to the higher end stuff.

I cannot say how long it truly lasts for since I apply it almost daily.  It doesn’t do much in terms of rain protection like Bead X does, but for how I use it (almost daily) it really doesn’t matter.  Also keep in mind that these products are not meant to replace washing your car, so they will never have as much protection as a good scrubbing and coat of wax.

I have noticed something less than ideal with this though.  When my car has been sitting in the sun and the metal is warm, this stuff tends to smudge and smear.  With my car being silver, I may not always notice it at certain angles, but after I apply it, wipe it down, and move on to another location (or worse, actually be done and get into my car to leave), at a certain angle, I will see smears and smudges.  Using the product over the spot again will generally get rid of it, so it’s not the biggest deal, but it is worth pointing out.

Will I buy this product again?  Absolutely!  I love my Bead X, but I can’t always fork out the money for the amount that I use it.  Do you use this product?  What do you think about it?  Let me know in the comment section below!

Want to read more reviews and see some other cool car stuff?  Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube channel.  Also be sure like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!  Thanks for stopping by!


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