Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Fixing My Door - Torino Time

1971 ford torino 500 v8 302 restoration zip tie door florida abandoned

For the first restoration/repair work of Torino Time, featuring my 1971 Ford Torino 500, I tackle that damn door. As I mentioned in the Torino Time intro, the driver side door stopped working from the outside while the engine was being worked on. I assumed this would be an easy fix, and something that I really wanted fixed soon, so that’s what I tackled first. 

First step was removing the door panel. It was a couple screws and some bolts. I was not prepared for the bolts holding the armrest in, but, whatever! I got them off after some time. 

I knew that something had just come disconnected. When I finally got the panel off, I found out that this had happened before, because the zip tie holding the mechanism in place from when it became disconnected in the past had broken. If it was good enough for the previous owner, it was good enough for me! One zip tie later, and I could use my door again. 

It wasn’t as good of a zip tie as the one that broke, so it will break again, but at least I know it can be fixed again! Aren’t old cars great? Check out the video for the full adventure. 

There is still so much more to do with this car, but I would hope that you join me in this adventure. Want to find out what I do next? Follow the series on this blog, or check out our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content and updates about what will be happening to this car next! Thanks for stopping by. 




Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Torino Time!

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car














Well, here’s a different one for you. I bought a 1971 Ford Torino 500. I have actually had this car for about seven months now, but I have really only been driving it for about a week. Why, you may ask? Because after about a week of owning it, she burst into flames. Yeah.

Anyway, here we are. I hope that you follow me on my path to restoring this car. It’s not going to be a full top to bottom restoration. There is too much to do, and I don’t want to put that much money into it. However, much of this stuff I have never done before, and I’m new to carbureted engines to being with, so this will be a learning experience. 

The good news about this car is that it runs and drives. That’s pretty much where the good news stops.

Rust has plagued this car. The trunk pan is rusted through, which includes the gas tank (I plugged eight holes in). The floor boards don’t exist. The roof is starting to go, though thankfully that is only surface rust for now. Also, there are rust holes here and there throughout the body.

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car

After the car caught on fire (due to a leaky fuel line), to did get some engine work done before I started this little series. The 302 V8 now as an electric HEI distributor, a new carburetor, new air filter, new spark plugs, and new spark plug wires.

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car

1971 ford torino 500 302 v8 restoration florida classic muscle car
There is still some work to do under there: new battery terminal to replace the one the fire department broke off, fix or replace the fan shroud (probably fix since a new one costs too much), and just tidy it up and clean it. 

The interior, besides the rust, needs to be looked at for small and big things such as the passenger window crank knob, dome light lens, gauge lights and glass, and stuff like that. Also, the driver side door no longer opens from the outside ever since I left it for the six months. 

There is a lot to do with this car, but I would hope that you join me in this adventure. Follow the series on this blog, or check out our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content and updates about what will be happening to this car next! Thanks for stopping by. 




Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Removing Fuel Drip Marks

fuel drip marks removal polish buff














Fuel drip marks are ugly, but pretty common. However, they are very easy and cheap to remove in less than five minutes, if you don’t let them get too bad. Here is a quick and easy way you can remove them by hand with one trip to Walmart and $15. Everything you buy, you can use again for other projects as well. 

For this, you need three things: 
  • Polish (or a compound, depending on the severity) 
  • A microfiber applicator pad 
  • A microfiber towel 
fuel drip marks removal polish buff

Out of all that, the polish will be your most expensive at probably around $8, while the rest will run you just a few dollars. 

Step one is to wash the area. While you won’t be able to wash the marks away, you will be rubbing the polish in. The last thing you want to do is rub any sand or dirt into the paint. Even though the polish will get rid of it, it’s best to work with a “clean” surface. 

Step two is to apply the polish to your applicator pad. A nickel sized amount in the middle is a good starting point. NOTE: Make sure you are using a polish, not a wax. Wax is for protecting, but a polish actually contains abrasives that cut into the surface. A rubbing compound is even stronger and may be needed if polish doesn’t work. 

Rub the polish coated pad in circular motions over the stained area. Don’t push hard enough to bend metal, but don’t be light enough to have the pad slip past your fingers. A moderate amount of pressure will do. Keep working the polish in. The area/polish will begin to haze. Let it sit for about thirty seconds or so. 

Step three involves some buffing. Take your clean microfiber towel, and with those same circular motions, buff the polish away. Perhaps a little more pressure, backing off to a little less. You should see that the marks are gone. If they are not, repeat the process again. If they really don’t seem to go away, try the same steps, but with a compound.

fuel drip marks removal polish buff
fuel drip marks removal polish buff

It’s really that simple. No special tools needed, and this literally takes less than five minutes. The results: looks brand new! 

Check out the video below for me doing this to my car. What to see more stuff like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by. 




Monday, October 17, 2016

Removing Hidden Rust


rust removal treatment body work sanding sealant














It’s been while (I think every recent post has started like that), but here is something different for you guys. I noticed a while back that the floor mat of my trunk was wet. I peeled it back, and sure enough, there was a pool of water and some nice rust. Thankfully, this was in an area that didn’t need to be made looking pretty, so my goal was to remove the rust, neutralize what remained, seal the leak, and call it a day. 

This is what you will need: 
  • Rough/low grit sandpaper 
  • Rust remover/neutralizer 
  • Primer (optional) 
  • Sealant 

Now, I am not a professional, and this was my first time doing this. Also, again, this was not meant to be a professional job. It was supposed to be quick and dirty. 

The first thing you want to do is find out where the leak is coming from. If you don’t stop that, your problem will keep happening. For me, I narrowed it down to two spots. One was an alignment hole for the real valance/bumper, and other was some damaged sealant. I took my sealant and smeared it over the alignment hole. That was simple.


The CORRECT way to tackle the other area would be to remove the old sealant with a wire brush, but I opted just to clean the area, and apply the new sealant over the old stuff. Preparation is everything. In the long run, this could bit me in the butt, but I just wanted to get this done quickly.


After that, you want to start sanding down the rust. I found some 80 grit sandpaper, so I attacked it all with that. Again, it doesn’t matter how this area looks for me. After you sand the area down as best you can, you have to clean it. A shop vac would be a great tool. I didn’t have one, so I managed with fingers and paper towels.


Now it’s time to treat the metal. An epoxy primer is probably best, but again, for quick and dirty, it was suggested I use Dupli Color Rust Fix. This stuff chemically converts whatever rusted metal is left into a black primer. It was pretty cool to see it work. Just follow the directions on the can. You might have to use a couple coats.


When that is dry (a full 24 hours would be best to wait), you might want to hit the area with a good primer just to tidy it all up. If you want it to look really good, apply some body filler to the area and sand that down to a smooth and factory looking finish, and follow it up with some more primer. I just left it at the Rust Fix state. Again, this is not in an area I care about.


If you see rust in an area like this, do your best to stop it as soon as you can! Rust spreads like a virus and can kill cars. Find the leak, stop the leak, remove the rust, treat the metal, and you’re good to go! 

To see me tackle my car, in a perhaps not so informative way, check out the video below. What to see more stuff like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by. 



Sunday, June 12, 2016

Action Gator Tire – Casselberry, FL Review

action gator tire casselberry florida review orlando mechanic oil change














Action Gator Tire

980 N Semoran Blvd

Casselberry, FL 32707


Story One – You Win Some 


When I find a shop that I like, I tend to stick with it. If I am looking for a new one, it’s because I need a specialty service done, the previous shop I went to messed up, or simply somewhere else has a better price. The main reason I go to shops is for an oil change. I don’t like changing my own oil as it takes time I don’t have, and it’s cheaper to do it at a shop. 

My reason for stumbling across Action Gator Tire in Casselberry (Florida) was because I needed tires. They were running a sale on Pirelli P4 all season tires, and I was currently driving on dry-rotted, rock hard, cheap-o-matic things that resembled tires. I generally buy cheap everything (as I’m on a budget) and can usually make things last that are not supposed to. Anyway, these tires were about $40 each! How could I say no? 

Well, I couldn’t. I went to the shop one morning and asked for the tires. The price I was told was not the price that came up online. That should have been my first flag. The man behind the counter wasn’t aware of the sale, so I had to pull up the ad. After a bit of negotiating, we got the price for four new tires, mounting, and all that to something I could agree to. Negotiation is rare, but they worked with me. 

I sat in the lobby and waited. It was what you would expect from an older shop: basic chairs, a little dirty, and so on. Nothing disturbing or anything. It had the expected look and scent. 

It really didn’t take that long, and I was on the road. 

Story Two – You Lose Some 


I always went to the same shop to get my oil changed. However, after my brakes had a catastrophic failure after they touched them last and assured me that they were fine when they started to rattle, I decided to try out Action Gator Tire, since my tire experience went well with them. I looked online and saw that they had a coupon for $19.95. 

I called and asked to make an appointment. I was met with a questioning rebuttal stating that they don’t accept appointments. Strange, but okay. I decided I would go in one morning a little bit after they opened. Here is where things get interesting. 

First off, I was told that they could not get me in because something broke in the shop, and the technician that would do my oil change was out taking care of that. The man behind the counter said, “This is why we don’t like to allow appointments, so when things happen like this, we don’t let customers down.” While this seems sincere, that leads me to believe this happens more frequently than they would like to admit. 

Fair enough though, right? Stuff happens. I asked when I could come back, and they said that a few hours should do it. Not what I wanted, but okay. I decided to inquire about the price of the oil change with the coupon before I left. Good thing I did because the final price (and this is WITH the $19.95 coupon) came out to over $30! What? Well, apparently you have to add on shop fees and things like that. That’s normal and expected, but generally just a couple extra bucks. 

At that moment, I walked out to their parking lot, looked up a new shop, and have not been back since. 

Bottom Line 


This is classic case of “you win some, you lose some”. Their service and price with the tires was really pleasing. Their service, lack of dedication, and obscure pricing regarding oil changes was not. Did I overreact by not coming back? I don’t think so. There are dozens upon dozens of shops begging for business. You mess up on one of my first encounters with you, I’ll simply go to another. 

I would recommend these guys for tires in Florida, and their other services may be great, but in a very competitive market (mechanic shops), it’s not hard to find another. They do have plenty of coupons online (that may or may not have your total price be reasonable), and they do run lots of sales on tires. They are a chain, so again, this one is only talking about the one in Casselberry, Florida. 

Have you been to this shop? Let me know what you thought about them in the comment section. Thank you for reading, and I hope that I helped! 

Want to learn about more shops like this? Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter!




Sunday, June 5, 2016

Rotting in Style - 1968 Mustang GT Fastback

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson
I have filmed and taken pictures of a lot of cars now for Rotting in Style. When it comes to muscle cars, I find Camaros all the time. However, this time, I bring to you a 1968 Mustang GT. Oh, and it’s a fastback!

Mustangs have been very hard for me to find, let alone a classic fastback. I guess that means Mustangs are worth keeping and Camaros are not? That’s right, I went there. Anyway, this fastback is indeed Rotting in Style at the Retro collection in Central Florida.  Not as bad as other cars featured on here such as the old El Camino in Alaska I filmed a while back. 

The condition is decent, actually. There are some bad rust spots, and the paint is shot, but the interior seems good, and so does the body overall. The driver side door is the worst. When you close it, rust falls like rain onto the pavement below.  However, the owner has told me that he has acquired a new door for it since I filmed it. 

That brings me to my next point: this car is NOT for sale, so please don’t ask. It belongs to one of the top dogs at Retro. It was originally his dad’s car, and he has some plans for it. He has acted on some of them including swapping in a fuel injected five liter from a 1980s Mustang. The rest of the plans include making her like Eleanor from the 2000 version of “Gone in 60 Seconds”. 

She is a slow work in progress, but a work in progress none the less! Now, I have been told that this car is going to be getting a second chance, so if you want to get updates about the progress on this car, I would suggest subscribing to our YouTube Channel

Until then, this car shall remain sitting, Rotting in Style. 

Oh… Don’t forget to check us out on Facebook and Twitter as well, and drop by Retro’s Facebook as well and tell them The Random Automotive sent you. Thanks for reading!





1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson

1968 ford mustang gt fastback abandoned rusty 302 5.0 retro florida dylan benson


Sunday, April 17, 2016

Rotting In Style - 1936 Chevy 1.5 Ton Truck

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson














With having about two days off per month now, bringing you quality content is becoming a little tough. So, I figured if I was going to bring you something, it might as well be good. Well, isn’t it always? Regardless, I’m back at Retro and bringing you what appears to be a 1936 Chevy 1.5 ton truck! 

I was originally told that this was a 1934, but based off a little research, the hood of this truck makes it appear to be at least a 1936. I’m not a truck expert, so I could be wrong. If it is a 1936, that makes this the second oldest vehicle to be featured on Rotting In Style so far. The oldest is a 1934 Austin 7 from the Gabel Collection. That car was known as the “Baby Austin”, but this truck is anything but baby. 

Now this thing is a truck. It’s wood, steel, and glass. That’s it. It’s one of those, “they don’t build them like they used to” things for sure. 

Getting the specs on this was easy. The GM Heritage Center has the original documents from 1936 that cover EVERYTHING about this. It’s a really cool document, and if you want to learn everything there is to know about these trucks, then it will be a good read for you.

Now, provided I looked up the right truck, this thing has a 206 cubic inch inline six that, based off the dyno sheets, yes dyno sheets, makes about 73 horsepower. Well, they look like dyno sheets at least. They are in the first few pages of the document. 

This looks like it was partially restored at one point. It doesn’t look new, but she doesn’t look like a barn find either. The interior is a bit rougher. The seat looks like it exploded, but it’s from 1936, so I’ll give it a break. The cool thing about the inside is, aside from the seat, it’s just like the outside: wood, metal, and glass. 

I’m a car guy, and I’m a Ford guy, but this truck has those sweet curves from the 30s, and it is an American classic regardless, so it has my vote of something awesome. 

I’m also sure she’s getting a second chance, because I don’t recall seeing her the last time I was at Retro. I’m sure wherever it is now, it’s being loved. She might have been saved from Rotting In Style.

UPDATE: She is still for sale.  Contact Retro for more information if you want it!

What to see more cars like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by.






1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

1936 chevy 1.5 ton truck chevrolet abandoned retro ridez garage florida rotting in style dylan benson

Sunday, March 6, 2016

Vehicles of Epocylipse: The AfterFall (Video Game)

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson














Video games are not something I normally touch on. I used to be a huge gamer, but growing up, I don’t make much time for them anymore. Even though I have compiled a list of the best driving games, I now spend some of my time creating the audio for them. Some of you may know that I am a sound guy. 

I am a voice actor for a game that will be coming out soon called “Epocylipse: The AfterFall”. One of the things that really interest me about the game are the unique vehicles that will be available in the game. After attending some of the development meetings, I started seeing some conceptual drawings of these vehicles, and all I can say is that they are badass! 

First off, a bit about the game. It takes place about sixty years after civilization as the future knows it has been destroyed. The year is about 2200, so technology has changed, and we can see that in these vehicles. 

Everything is battery powered. Gone are the internal combustion engines. Also gone are tires as we know it. Everything that has a tire has an airless tire. Companies today, such as Bridgestone, are making airless tires, so this is something we can expect to see in the future. Some of the vehicles ditch tires all together and use antigravity pads and hover. 

Here is where things get a little disappointing though. Apparently these vehicles are not designed for speed. “Epocylipse: The AfterFall” is a turn based game, and apparently these vehicles are only really designed to move the player a bit more than if he or she was on foot.

That aside, they are supposed to be quite customizable. Players will be able to increase the battery capacity, add more firepower, and more. So, even if they are slow, if I can shoot machine guns from them, I think that will make up for it. I have been told that eventually the vehicles will be able to have custom paint jobs and decals as well. That would be a really unique way to make these things your own! 

So, living in world full of combat, theft, raids, and more, these things are built to be tough. They are all pretty much combat vehicles in their own way. Based off the drawings, even the ones designed for transport have solid metal sides. I really get a feel of “Red Faction: Guerrilla” when I look at these things. 

I would say that one of the most interesting features I have heard will happen is a visible load feature. Basically, if players add gear, looted items, or whatever onto their vehicles, you will be able to see that. I have seen in the past where if you add something to a vehicle, there might be one of two different animations to show that there is stuff in the vehicles, or you may never see anything at all (like in “State of Decay” and many other games). So this little thing adds such a big way to envelope you into the game. Those are the things that I like to see in games: those tiny details that make such a difference. 

Personally, I can’t wait to see what they can do. If you are interested in the game, take a look at the Epocylipse: The AfterFall Facebook page, and the Razor Edge Games website.



epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

epocylipse the after fall video game review razor edge games vehicles cars random automotive dylan benson

Friday, February 26, 2016

US Mail Truck Specs

usps mail truck specs engine post office grumman llv random automotive dylan benson














If you live in the United States, you see these everywhere: the US Postal Service Mail Truck. Recently, I have been very curious about what these things actually are. I mean, no one else uses them, so I had to know what makes them so special. Turns out they actually have a name: the Grumman LLV. 

LLV stands for Long Life Vehicle, and that is exactly what they were designed to do. The USPS (back in the 1980s) presented a list of requirements to anyone interested in making the next postal vehicle to replace the Jeeps they used before. The Smithsonian Postal Museum has that list:

  • Drive 5,760 miles on a closed loop 5-mile-long paved road at 50 to 55 mph 
  • Drive 11,520 miles over a gravel road at 30 to 45 mph 
  • Drive 2,880 miles over a road with a shoulder, stopping every 250 feet and accelerating to 15 mph in between 
  • Drive 960 miles over cobblestones that ranged from 3 to 4 inches high at 10 to 14 mph
  • Drive 960 miles over potholes at 10 to 14 mph 
  • Haul a 1-ton pound load during one half of the road test 
  • Haul a man and a 400 pound load during one half of the road test 
  • Drive over potholes ensuring that each wheel hits a pothole 35,000 times 
  • Make one hundred consecutive stops from 15 mph 

If you think about it, these things basically had to be tanks, and they had to be tanks for a long time. Eventually, a company named Grumman Corporation won the contract, and the first LLV was placed into service in 1986. The last one was made in 1994. Yes, that means every mail truck (LLV style) that you see on the road is at least 22 years old. 

The lifespan was originally slated to be 24 years. In 2009, the USPS changed that to 30 years. 

While these were made by an aircraft engineering company that doesn’t exactly exist anymore (it is now part of the well known Northrop Grumman), they are pretty much a Chevy S10/Blazer under the aircraft-like, sheet metal exterior. 

The chassis was made by General Motors, and based off of the 2WD Blazer and S10. The front suspension and instrument cluster are similar to the S-10 as well. The engine first put into the trucks was the 2.5L “Iron Duke”, and then later a General Motors 2.2L I-4 iron block/aluminum head engine. This is paired with a 3-speed Turbo-Hydramatic 180 automatic transmission. 

One would think that these would be a little more fuel efficient, but apparently they are only supposed to get around 17 miles per gallon. With the constant stop a go they are put through, it is said they get closer to 10. I guess that we have to keep in mind that these were designed at a time when MPGs were not the most standard three letters in average conversation. Let’s also keep in mind that we are talking about the US government. They always have money.

usps mail truck specs engine post office grumman llv random automotive dylan benson

Here are some basic specs: 

Engine: GM Iron Duke
Transmission: 3-speed Turbo-Hydramatic 180 automatic transmission 

Horsepower: About 90hp
0-60 MPH: Approximately 17 seconds
Top Speed: Supposedly about 75 MPH 

Wheelbase: 8 ft 4.5 in (2.553 m)
Length: 14 ft 7.5 in (4.458 m)
Width: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Height: 7 ft 1 in (2.16 m)
Curb weight: 2,700 lb (1,200 kg)

usps mail truck specs engine post office grumman llv random automotive dylan benson
Best picture I could find of the engine.  It's of the one I found for sale.
The power and speed specs were gathered from random sources like forums, but they seem accurate. These trucks were built for reliability, hauling, and stuff like that, not quarter mile drag racing. Though, that would be interesting to see. 

Fun fact: I found one for sale online, and the VIN was supplied. When I looked up the VIN, it came back as an S10 pickup. Most places I looked it up though, it said something along the lines of, “please enter a valid VIN”. 

These little trucks will be going away though. In mid 2015, the US Government started looking for a contract to start replacing the long serving Grumman LLV. Canada, which apparently uses these as well, has started replacing them with Ford Transit Connect vans. The USPS has been starting to use more minivans in its fleet, but the LLV is slated to go bye-bye. 

I am curious to see what will happen to them. Who knows if they will be trashed or scrapped, sold at auction, or none of the above? It would be interesting to see these US government vehicles sitting next to Humvees also being sold at an auction. Time will tell. Until then, where’s my mail? 

Thanks for stopping by! Like what you see? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!

Saturday, February 13, 2016

How To Own A New Ford GT


2017 ford gt price qualifications application how to own supercar the random automotive dylan benson














So, you’ve come here because you want to own one of the simply incredible new Ford GTs, right? You have the $400,000 needed, so you’re set, right? Not quite.

Ford is going to make potential owners of the of the new super cars apply online. In doing so, they will be asked a series of questions and have to meet certain criteria. I recently was watching a video from SuperSpeedersRob where the owner, Rob Ferretti, talks about wanting to get one, and what you have to do to get one. Basically, there seem to be four points:
  1. You have to sign a legal document that states you will not sell the car for a certain period of time. 
  2. You have to prove that you will actually drive the car. 
  3. You have to show that you have owned previous Fords in the past. 
  4. You have to have a large social media following.
This is very strange, but I kind of like it. I am a huge Ford fan, and I like that Ford is only letting certain people own these cars. However, if you have the money, you should be able to get what you want, and do with it what you want. 

Regardless, let’s take a look at these points. 

The first one is to help ensure that someone won’t buy one (or more) of the limited 250 cars being produced, and then mark it up for a profit. I get that. Ford wants people to own the car who want the car, not a profit. 

The driving part is actually shocking, but I love it. Cars, regardless of price or quality, are built to be driven, and Ford wants the GT driven. I am not sure how they will monitor this, but it’s a pretty bold statement. Especially for people who want to keep the miles off. I’m sure Ford won’t make you drive it 10,000 miles per year, but knowing it will be on the road is pretty amazing. 

Brand loyalty is important to every company, so showing that you have owned (I’m assuming high-end) Fords in the past is not a bad thing. It’s a good way to “give back” to loyal customers. Well, loyal customers that happen to have a lot of money. 

The social media aspect I do not agree with. My reason is simple: I don’t like showoffs. I get that Ford wants people to see their cars, and what better way than with people posting on social media? However, I am sure there is a very humble rich person out there who meets every other criteria, but doesn’t like to brag and play the “look what I have and you don’t” game. I hope a person like that isn’t out of getting one of these cars simply for that. 

“There’s a loyal following to the car,” Raj Nair, Ford’s product chief, said in an interview. “We want to prioritize people who are going to care about the car, keep the car and drive the car.” 

While this is a strange concept, it is an interesting one none the less. It is one that I actually like. It will assure these cars, that are built to be driven, will actually be driven! What do you think? Let me know in the comments below! 

Thanks for stopping by! Like what you see? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content!


Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Rotting in Style - 1967 Cadillac Fleetwood Seventy-Five (Limo)

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy














It seems like every post recently starts the same: “It’s been a while since I posted a car…” You know what? It’s been a while since I posted a car. However, I’m feeling fancy, so let’s get fancy with this 1967 Cadillac Fleetwood Seventy-Five (limo). That’s right. The car that looks like something a past President would have driven in. (Apparently an ex-president of South Africa did).

Definitely not in its current state though. While it may look fine from a distance, aside from the fact that its ass is on the ground, up close reveals that neglect is taking its toll. While it’s not THAT bad, the paint is starting to rust in some parts, as well as some of the chrome.

Speaking of the outside, this is a lot of Cadillac. We’re talking a length of 244.5 inches. That’s over twenty feet long! If that wasn’t enough, she’s got a curb weight of over 5450 pounds. That’s a big girl. However, under the hood is a 429 cubic inch V8 that makes an advertised 340 horsepower. Apparently it’s enough to propel all that from zero to sixty in about ten seconds. Crazy, right?

It is a limo, so what about this inside? Well, it’s a bit worse than the outside. It’s ripped, torn, pitted, dirty, and so on, but this is Rotting in Style! That’s just the way I like it.

It has quite a bit. There are footrests that can turn into jump seats. There are temperature controls, window controls, partition controls, and perhaps an ejector seat button? While I like my idea better, apparently that’s part of the AM radio control system. I believe that and the partition (and partition controls obviously) where options, because I didn’t see them in pictures of all the Fleetwood Seventy-Fives when I was doing research.

Up front is a typical 1960s Cadillac look. There are a couple extra buttons, switches, and dials that I am not sure about, but hey, it’s a limo. Even the driver seat is one long, comfy bench.

While I don’t think this car will be toting around the rich and famous any time soon in its current condition, it still has that timeless automotive fashion as sit here, Rotting in Style.

What to see more “I’m so fancy” cars like this? Make sure you head on over and subscribe to our YouTube channel. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook, and be sure to follow us on Twitter for some exclusive content! Thanks for stopping by.





1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

1967 cadillac fleetwood seventy-five 75 limo abandoned retro ridez garage db productions rotting in stye dylan benson gm chevy

Share

Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More